CHILDREN IN STATE’S FOSTER CARE SYSTEM NEED ADOPTIVE HOMES

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Throughout the month of November, which was proclaimed Adoption Month in Michigan by Gov. Rick Snyder, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) shared stories of children in need of forever homes.

Stories included Bruce, a 13-year-old boy from West Michigan who likes koala bears and French fries, and wishes for “family safety, for lots of love and for the world to be a better place.” And Mariah, a 15-year-old girl who enjoys playing cards and crocheting purses.

Approximately 3,000 Michigan foster children are available for adoption at any given time. Of those children, nearly 300 do not have an identified adoptive family. Bruce and Mariah were just two of those children seeking homes.

MDHHS, in partnership with adoption agencies and courts, works to find and build forever families through adoption. In 2017, more than 1,900 children were adopted from the Michigan foster care system.

Children in the foster care system become eligible for adoption following the termination of parental rights due to abuse or neglect. There are about 13,000 children in the foster care system, but the goal for most of these children is reunification with their families.

While Michigan Adoption Day ceremonies took place around the state — including Nov. 21 at the Michigan Supreme Court Hall of Justice in Lansing — the need for permanent homes for hundreds of youth still exists.

“All children should have permanent homes to call their own,” said MDHHS Director Nick Lyon. “We appreciate the love and stability provided by our adoptive families and hope that more Michiganders will open their hearts to adoption.”

For information on children available for adoption, including Bruce and Mariah, visit mare.org. For information about adoption in Michigan, visit michigan.gov.


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